The Mixed Tape


Tyler’s Top 10 Films of 2009 by tylercoenrrea

I missed a lot due to economic struggles. But that’s okay.

1. The Hurt Locker

dir. Kathryn Bigelow

I just can’t get enough of it. What better way to end our decade then with a brilliant film about the war that shadowed our generation. Jeremy Renner and Anthony Mackie both give powerful performances and Bigelow’s direction is nothing but perfection. The best war film of this decade that steers away from political opinion and concentrates on the emotional and personal aspect of a faceless combat.

2. Inglorious Basterds

dir. Quentin Tarantino

Leave it to Tarantino to bring us another boldly insane compilation of history, art, and violence that may be the most entertaining film this year. Unpredictable as always, Tarantino jumps between storys, arranging them like puzzle pieces and connecting them in the end to an explosive climax that rewrites history. Points also go to one of the most intelligent villains in film history.

3. Up

dir. Pete Docter & Bob Peterson

…and Pixar continues to dominate the animated world. No surprise with another original outing that introoduces more hilarious characters interacting with beautiful animation. Not only is it a comedy but also touches on mature subject of human loss and the weight of our personal goals. Where many kids’ films fail, Up succeeds in every way.

4. Up In The Air

dir. Jason Reitman

Jason Reitman has proved himself to be one of the brightest new directors to emerge from the past decade. This one can easily be marked as his best film to date. With Clooney’s charm and Reitman’s direction, Up In The Air uses the crumbling foundations of our fears and economic struggles to tell a story about human connection and the dire need that we sometimes forget.

5. A Serious Man

dir. Joel & Ethan Coen

Nobody does dark comedy quite like the Coens and this one is just as incredible as Fargo and No Country For old Men. As much of a study of a man’s degradation as it is of Jewish culture, A Serious Man has a dark agenda for its viewers as well as its characters. The last shot is a killer.

6. District 9

dir. Neill Blomkamp

2009 was a great year for science fiction. Newcomer Blomkamp had an original concept and he used that to create an exciting alien thriller all at the low cost of 30 million. Here’s proof (Michael bay, please take note) that story and execution are the most rewarding aspects in great filmmaking.

7. (500) Days of Summer

dir. Marc Webb

A thoughtful and intelligent anti-love story featuring some of todays most promising young talent, (500) Days can claim the award for sleeper hit of the year. And it deserves it, for being a clever little film studying the clashes between our generations perspective on the joy, confusion, and pain that comes with it.

8. Star Trek

dir. J.J. Abrams

I’m sure many people’s favorite CGI infested blockbuster this year was Avatar which was a great movie but this one still stands as my favorite. I’m not even a Trekkie (Trekker?). I rarely watched the show but this movie contained every amounts of fun and excitement a blockbuster should contain. Colorful characters, incredible effects, and a sharp script, we were spoiled this summer.

9. Drag Me To Hell

dir. Sam Raimi

Lets face it, the 2000s was a terrible decade for horror. It wasn’t until the end that the masterful Raimi broke away from his silly superhero genre to give us one of the most awesome descents into the genre since his Evil Dead trilogy. Funny? Scary? It’s both and it’s one hell of a ride. Pun intended.

10. Observe and Report

dir. Jody Hill

My most controversial pick here. Say what you want about this dark film, there is no other comedy quite like this one (and don’t you dare say Paul Blart: Mall Cop). I loved this movie for it’s careful attention to it’s characters and the social destruction it creates as Seth Rogen’s (in his best performance to date) mall cop Ronnie breaks the definition of “off your meds.” It may make you laugh or it may just disgust you, but if you think Observe and Report is another mindless, crude, potty-mouthed comedy, you are dead wrong.

Honorable Mentions:

Zombieland

World’s Greatest Dad

Avatar

Watchmen

The Hangover

Thirst

Like I said before, not that much money so I still gotta see these:

Crazy Heart

Where The Wild Things Are

The White Ribbon

The Road

Precious

Fantastic Mr. Fox

A Single Man

Moon

The Informant

-Tyler Correa



Tyler’s Favorite Films of the Decade by tylercoenrrea
January 1, 2010, 12:52 am
Filed under: Film, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , ,

And what a decade it was.

10. Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers

In all honesty the whole trilogy belongs up here as one movie. But just like Empire Strikes Back and The Godfather Part II the second is the best. Here are the three reasons why: Gollum, Helm’s Deep, Sam’s Speech.

9. Wall-E

The best animated film of the decade. Storytelling at it’s greatest and evidence that Pixar is one of the most creative powers in the business. Truly a remarkable film that reminds us we don’t need celebrity voices, crude humor, or pop culture references to reach children.

8. Kill Bill Vol. 1

Quentin Tarantino lets his love for cinema and bloody chaos rule the screen in an orgy of artful violence and Asian culture. One of the most entertaining films this decade, it’s filmmaking at it’s greatest.

7. The Hurt Locker

The Platoon of the 2000’s, this is the first great film about the Iraq War. No political message, no cliches, just a story about the men who stare death in the face and call it their job.

6. Children of Men

A mesmerizing look at hope in the face of anarchy. Expertly crafted with long takes, Alfonso Cuaron presents to us a science fiction tale strung together with human emotion, enchanting characters, and a world on the brink of destruction.I know it’s said a lot but this is a “one-of-a-kind” film.

5. Elephant

I’m having trouble describing the emotions of how I can praise this film. It’s a haunting portrayal of a high school and its moments leading up to an unsuspected act of violence. The camera gracefully follows a random selection of students and their interactions with each other just as their lives will be shaken by the events. Gus Vant Sant’s boldest and argubly greatest film to date as he doesn’t ask questions about the tragic lives of teenagers but simply shows us the dark abyss from which they cannot escape.

4. Requiem For A Dream

Hey kids, you don’t wanna do drugs. But don’t take my word for it, just ask Mr. Aronofsky here, in fact he’s got a little film he would like to show you. It will numb your senses, and take all your fears and trials and shove them into a pit of acid. Then it will make you watch the lives of these four individuals as they deteriorate into worthless, meaningless experiences. You’ll cry. Believe me, you will cry.

3. Slumdog Millionaire

There is nothing wrong with this movie. Everything is perfect about it and it will be remembered for years to come.

2. No Country For Old Men

Upon first seeing this film I had no idea what to think of it. This was unlike any Coen brother movie they had ever made so I was confused. But I couldn’t get it out of my head. Tommy Lee Jones’ apocalyptic words stayed in my head for days, and soon I began to realize I loved this film. Dark, disturbing, and nodding its head at hopelessness, the Coen brothers have not topped themselves yet. A movie that will stay in your mind forever and that’s what makes it great.

1. Oldboy

If you have not seen this film do yourself a favor and see it as soon as possible. Asian filmmaking is strongly generated by their powerful and creative storytelling. Oldboy is proof of that. A twisted tale of revenge that would have been a disaster in the hands of an American director (we’re looking at you Spielberg). Everything about Chan-wook Park’s masterpiece is brilliant, from the brutality to the emotinally wrecking plot. Beautifully shot and perfectly acted, this is a film that is years ahead of it’s time. It will be studied for years to come and if you can stomach the dark places it descends you will experience a film like no other.

Honorable Mentions:

Gangs of New York

The Dark Knight

The Fall

The 25th Hour

There Will Be Blood

Cast Away

Best In Show

Adaptation

Inglorious Basterds

– Tyler Correa



5 Films This Summer You Probably Didn’t See by Nolan Wilson Goff

This past summer featured the fantastic (J.J. Abrams’ Star Trek) and the awful (Michael Bay’s Transformers 2). Amongst the successful box office hits, were many hidden gems that may have escaped the public eye.

Here are 5 films this summer that found critical success, despite their limited releases.

The Hurt Locker

hurt-locker-boom

A near lock for a Best Picture nomination, Kathryn Bigelow’s brilliantly paced Iraq war thriller awed everyone who saw it. It featured fantastic characters with fantastic performances by Jeremy Renner and Anthony Mackie. “The rush of battle is often a potent and lethal addiction, for war is a drug.”

(500) Days of Summer

500-days

This film is the best representation of post-modern love ever seen on screen. The performances by Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Zooey Deschanel, have been widely acclaimed, and for good reason. “This is the story of boy meets girl…but I must tell you up front, this is not a love story. It is a story about love.”

The Stoning of Soraya M.

Stoning - IMG_5887

Wow. As heartbreaking as this film is, it is a story that must be heard.  The title says it all, and this film must be seen. You will be awed by the power of this true story, and the importance of journalism. The Stoning is a true example of the mistreatment of women in Muslim society, and Shoreh Aghdashloo’s breathtaking performance will floor you. “Voices of women do not matter in here. I want you to take my voice with you.”

Moon

rockwell-moon-21

Starring Sam Rockwell and the voice of Kevin Spacey, Moon is the terrific directorial debut of Duncan Jones.  Moon is much like a interesting, action filled version of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey.  The film is essentially a one man show, but Rockwell’s performance grabs ahold of audiences and grants us entry into the psyche of his character. Aditionally, Clint Mansell’s score is the best of the year. 250,000 miles from home, the hardest thing to face…is yourself.

Sin Nombre

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The Sundance Film Festival darling, and directorial debut of Cary Fukunaga, is a foreign road movie detailing the trevails and passions of those venturing to the American border. Complete with gang violence and love, the story is a tragedy exploring themes of atonement and sacrifice. The greatest sin of all is risking nothing.

What was your favorite film of the summer?

-Nolan Wilson Goff

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